Guanabana

Guanabana

  • +Description

    Guanabana, native to Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean and northern South America, is related to cherimoya. The dark green, whitish-green speckled skin has a diamond pattern, each diamond has a soft, curved spine. The white interior pulp is studded with many large seeds, and pockets of soft flesh are bounded by fibrous membranes. The flesh is juicy and has a sweet taste.

  • +Availability

    Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available

    Guanabana is available from Vietnam.

  • +Main nutrients

    Calcium, Folate, Iron, Potassium, Sodium, Vitamin B and C.

Main varieties

  • Guanabana

    Guanabana

    The dark green, whitish-green speckled skin has a diamond pattern, each diamond has a soft, curved spine.

    View Guanabana

Preparation

Preparation

Cut the fruit vertically into two halves. From here, either cut the halves into watermelon-like slices, or scoop out the two white fleshy halves with a tablespoon. The skin is not eaten.

Consumption

In Mexico it is a common fruit often used for dessert. Guanabana ice cream and fruit bars are also very popular. The fruit is somewhat difficult to eat out-of hand, as the white interior pulp is studded with many large seeds, and pockets of soft flesh are bounded by fibrous membranes. The guanabana is therefore usually juiced rather than eaten directly. The seeds are commonly not eaten.

When to eat

Ripe guanabana is a bit soft. Keep ripe guanabana refrigerated and consume within a few days.

Did you know?

  • Guanabana is actually the Spanish name for Soursop.
  • In the Philippines, it is known as guyabano.
  • Guanabana is often used to make soda.
  • In the Caribbean it is believed that laying the leaves of the guanabana on a bed below a sleeping person with a fever, ¬†will break the fever by the next morning.