Passion Fruit

Passion Fruit

  • +Description

    Passion fruit is a member of the of Passiflora and grows on a climbing-plant. Passion fruit is native from Brazil. There are a number of varieties of passion fruit, some are sweeter than others, some are the size of a egg and some are three times as large. The skin is leathery and purple. The fruit contains a yellow, jelly-like pulp with a scattering of black edible seeds.

  • +Availability

    Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available

    Passion fruit is available from Colombia, Thailand and Zimbabwe.

  • +Main nutrients

    Calcium, Iron, Vitamin A and C.

Main varieties

  • Passion fruit with a green skin is not ripe yet.

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  • When the skin of the passion fruit is purple, it is ripe. The fruit is a delicious combination of sweet and sour flavors.

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  • Wrinkled passion fruits are not overripe, but perfectly ripe. When wrinkled the sweet sour taste becomes somewhat sweeter.

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Preparation

Preparation

Cut the fruit into two halves. From here, scoop out the jelly-like pulp with a tablespoon. Now it is ready to be consumed, cooked or converted into juice. The skin can not be eaten.

Consumption

Passionfruit is commonly eaten by itself. However it makes a wonderful jelly, pie filling or cake frosting. Seeds with the surrounding juice sacs are also often added to fruit salads.

When to eat

Unripe passion fruit can be kept at room temperature until it is. Ripe passion fruit can be refrigerated for a few days.

Did you know?

  • In Hawaii the common name of the passion fruit is lilikoi.
  • Catholic missionaries in South America gave the fruit its name because they thought the flowers of the plant looked like the crown of thorns that was placed on Christ’s head.
  • Passion fruits are For Life certified.