Rambutan

Rambutan

  • +Description

    The rambutan is native to southeast Asia and is closely related to the lychee and longan. The skin is red and covered with hairy spines. The flesh is semitransparent or pale pink and has a mainly sweet flavour. The single seed is glossy brown and not edible.

  • +Availability

    Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
    Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available Available

    Rambutans are available from Vietnam, Thailand and Indonesia

  • +Main nutrients

    Vitamin C, Iron, Calcium.

Main varieties

  • Rambutan

    Rambutan

    The leathery hairy skin of the rambutan is reddish and covered with fleshy pliable spines, hence the name rambutan, derived from the Malaysian word “rambut” which means “hairs”.

    View Rambutan

Preparation

Preparation

The peeled rambutan is occasionally stewed as dessert. In some countries a preserve is made by first boiling the peeled fruit to separate the flesh from the seeds. Seeds are boiled alone until soft. They are combined with the flesh and plenty of sugar for about before sealing the jar. The seeds are sometimes roasted and eaten. They should not be eaten raw.

Consumption

Rambutan is most commonly eaten out-of-hand after peeling off the husk. Be careful not to bite too deeply, the flesh might come away with the papery skin of the seed attached, and that is not rambutan at its best.

When to eat

The fruit is ripe when the skin has turned red. The "hairs" are allowed to be a bit dark coloured.

Did you know?

  • The name rambutan is derived from the Malaysian word “rambut” which means “hairs”.
  • Rambutan trees bear twice annually, once in late fall and early winter with a shorter season in late spring and early summer.
  • If the humidity is high, then the fruit can be held at room temperature in a plastic bag that is not sealed but rather loosely closed.
  • Rambutan grows in a cluster of  10-20 pieces.